Dario Tazzioli

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    Born in 1979 in Sassuolo, Italy. At the age of fifteen, Dario Tazzioli began learning traditional stone carving techniques from an old master stone carver of his home village.

    He began forging his own iron chisels to obtain a high quality of form in his stonework, and still handforges his tools today. From a young age, he began using natural pigments and minerals extracted from the local land to pigment his drawing paper.
After many years of practice, sanguine (red pastel), quill pen and metal tipped calligraphy pens have become his drawing instruments of choice.

    Presently he lives and works in Frassinoro, Italy where he works for private and public commissions for sculpture and architectural details. www.dariotazzioli.com

Olivia Kim

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Olivia  Kim was born in the Philippines and immigrated to Rochester, New York as a child. From an early age, she studied dance, theatre, instrumental and vocal music, and visual arts. This allowed her to develop her understanding of the common creative link between disparate art forms. Olivia’s mixed cultural upbringing kept her from being fixed to any one social group, allowing her to more objectively investigate common links in the human experience. She has traveled throughout America, Asia, Europe, Central and South America to explore the cultures of the ancient to recent past. She incorporates a wide range of materials and techniques to compliment her historical education.
    At the New York State College of Ceramics, School of Art and Design at Alfred University of Alfred, New York, she studied techniques in printmaking, painting, wood carving and ceramic sculpture. She graduated cum laude with Divisional Honors in Ceramic Sculpture in 2001. From 2001-2004 she completed a 3-year Certificate program with fourth year specialization in realist drawing and sculpting the human figure at the Florence Academy of Art. At the FAA she was a drawing instructor to the sculpture students, and received Prize for Best Sculpture upon graduation.
    In 2005 she moved to the towns of Carrara and Pietrasanta, Italy to learn techniques in bronze casting and stone carving. For five years she produced public and private commissions in stone, bronze, and mural painting alongside teaching and exhibiting her work in Europe. In 2009 she briefly returned to the FAA to study oil painting. Her return to Rochester, NY in 2010 has led to the development of works that address the experience of living and moving in a human body. Empathy, direct practice, kinesiology and biomechanics are the foundation of her understanding of poses. Her work is executed in the medium appropriate to the particular expression being conveyed: cast glass, bronze, terra-cotta, paper, oils or drawing mediums.
    Presently she is producing a body of work based on everyday movement and dance forms. She has collaborated with Futurepointe Dance and Natalie Rogers-Cropper with Garth Fagan Dance Company. Her  work has recently been added to the permanent collection at the Burchfield Art Center in Buffalo, NY in March 2015. Olivia’s artwork is displayed publicly and privately in Europe, Australia, and the USA.

www.oliviakimstudio.com

Liz Gribin

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Liz Gribin was born in London in 1934. She and her family moved to the United States just as World War II broke out. Arriving in Manhattan, she began her studies at the Museum of Modern Art and the Art Students League, obtaining her degree in fine arts from Boston University. Niece of the world famous Danish sculptor, Harald Salomon, she has exhibited her work nationally for many years. In New York City her prize-winning paintings have been shown at The National Academy of Design, the Parsons School, Pace University, The National Arts Club, the Lotos Club and the Broome Street Gallery. Outside of the city they have been shown at the Nassau County Museum of Art, The Heckscher Museum, Guild Hall Museum, Sarah Lawrence College, B.J. Spoke Gallery, and the Arlene Bujese Gallery. Gribin has had over a dozen solo exhibitions. She is the winner of innumerable awards, including the Bruce Stevenson Award from the National Arts Club, the Pall Corporation Award at the Heckscher Museum, the Knickerbocker Artist's Gold Medal and the top award from the Audubon Artists, two years running. Her work is part of the permanent collections of the Emily Lowe Gallery at Hofstra University and the Manhattan Bowery Corporation in addition to many outstanding private collections. She was chosen to be honored with the prestigious Eleanor Roosevelt Award for Advancing the Arts on Long Island.

Honored by the Hampton Library as a "living legend" during the bicentennial celebration of the U.S. Library Of Congress. Listed in "Who's Who in American Art" and "Who's Who of American Women". Artist spotlighted on the first "Originals", Public Broadcasting System's television show. The artist and her work have been profiled in The Southampton Press and Dan's papers, Portfolio, Northshore, Boulevard and Long Island magazines. Interviewed on Art Scene on Long Island, Meet Your Neighbors and Focus On Women, which is part of Harvard University, Schlesinger Library Archives. Now back in Massachusetts after half a century, she enjoys working and living in her spacious studio in Gorse.

www.lizgribin.com

Joan Wye

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1926-2006

Joan Wye was born in the U.S. but lived in Berlin, Germany for most of her childhood until the age of thirteen. Her mother had sent her to live with Joan’s great aunt who ran a boarding house, and Joan’s grandfather who was the conductor of a symphony orchestra. In 1939 Joan’s mother came to rescue her from the horrors of Nazi Germany and take her back to the U.S. and then Argentina.  
     
After high school in Buenos Aires, Joan left to enroll in the Art Student League of NY where she had her formal training. She married another League student, had a daughter Carol, and the family moved to Provincetown, Massachusetts. Joan had started out a painter but in Provincetown she took up the medium of wood carving and to a lesser degree bronze casting.  
    
 After twenty years in Provincetown, she divorced and moved to Somerville, Massachusetts with the man who would become her second husband, the painter, Jackson Gregory. They both found space in a factory building that was to become a well known artists and artisans studio building: 20 Vernon Street in Somerville. Joan initially created some large papier mache brick sculptures and then invented a tile making process which led to an art tile business called Belfast Bay Tileworks. Her husband Jackson joined her and for the next 18 years Belfast Bay designed, produced and sold their art tiles in the metro Boston area, New York, Cape Cod, Maine and other locations round the country.  In addition to residential installations, she and her husband created public art tile murals for Boston area’s Red Line (MBTA), The Children’s Hospital, New England Home for Little Wanders, and Roberts School, as well as for the Niagara Transportation Authority in Buffalo, NY.

Wye also started making art works using tile mosaics as a medium. In 1985, Wye and Gregory bought property on Vinahaven Island, Maine and moved there permanently in 1990. They bought a much reduced version of the tile business with them to Vinalhaven which they continued until 2000, when they retired from the tile making to devote full time to their painting. With a spacious studio, Joan finally got back to her first love, painting. She was a prolific artist and made up for lost time by turning out about 300 paintings in the last ten years of her life.
      
Wye is associated with number of galleries in Provincetown, Boston and New York. Her paintings, sculptures, mosaic tile pieces are in collections across the U.S. She died at home on Vinahaven in August of 2006.

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Jackson Gregory

Born in 1938, Jackson Gregory grew up in Provincetown, Massachusetts. His father was a printmaker and photographer and his mother a concert pianist and piano teacher, who were part of the sizable art community in that town. His parents and artists friends encouraged Jackson in his early efforts in art making. He is a graduate of the School of the Museum of Fine arts (SMFA) in Boston where he spent ten years as a student, graduate student, Traveling Scholar and teacher.
 
In 1967 after two years of teaching, Jackson left SMFA to concentrate on his own work, which by this time called for a more complete involvement of time and effort. This was the beginning of his use of geometric forms as the basis of his work. He added ceramic tile as a medium in 1977 and also created public art murals in Boston, Cambridge and Somerville, MA., and Buffalo, NY. Gregory lives and maintains a studio on Vinalhaven Island in Maine. He and his wife artist Joan Wye moved there in 1990. Joan died in 2006.  
    
Awards include: 47th Bartlett Traveling Scholar: Grant and Fellowship, Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown; Boskop Foundation Grant, Council for the Arts and Humanities, Somerville Arts Council, MA.

Selected Exhibitions: Cornell University; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; De Cordova Museum, Lincoln, MA; City Hall, Boston; Brockton Art Center; New Era Gallery; First National Bank of Chicago; Harbor Square Gallery, Rockland, Maine, and numerous private collections.

 

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James Bonner

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Born in 1959 in Little Rock, Arkansas, contemporary American realist painter James Michael Bonner received his formal training in art at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock primarily under the late Al Allen.
Citing the painters Andrew and Jamie Wyeth as major influences of his art, James taught himself how to paint with egg tempera and dry-brush watercolor eventually developing his own identifiable style.  In addition, Jamie Wyeth’s proclivity for mixing different mediums has influenced him with incorporating oils, acrylics, casein, and gouache into his work.   
    Having a desire to experience what other artists, including the Wyeth’s, have when in Maine, James began visiting there in the 1990’s and always enjoys painting and drawing the often-overlooked scenes that fade into the background of everyday life. Maine is beautiful and gritty all at the same time. It’s these opposing forces that oftentimes are explored through the hidden ambiguities of his work.
In 2003, while rock climbing, James suffered a traumatic injury that would change the direction of his life away from art for almost a decade. The aftermath of the accident left him without the ability to paint because of limited dexterity in his hand. Unhappy without the ability to express emotion through his art, he was determined to comeback. In 2012 he began the arduous therapy of re-training his motor skills to facilitate the delicate details of his art. Although it takes longer to draw and paint now, some of his recent pieces have proven to be some of his “strongest” pieces to date.
     James currently resides in Arkansas with his wife Hope and their two dogs Mocha and Maggie. He has artwork in corporate collections in the south and east coast, along with many private collections in Arkansas, New York, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Washington DC, Florida, Delaware and Maine.  

“My intent as a painter is to create a narrative that pervades the painting. By starting out with the literal truth and then relying mostly on memory, I begin to think or dream away the extraneous detail of a particular scene or object until I’m down to the “bare bones” of what I’m emotionally connected to.  Simplicity, to me, is always better.
Being an artist, to me, is not just about possessing the ability to copy something exactly as it is in nature, although admirable, but using your creativity to impart your own vision. What comes naturally for me is a bit convoluted, in that my paintings are based in reality, but with a heavy dose of my own creativity and imagination added. Perfection bores me, at least technical perfection, and thinking everything you do might be a masterpiece is dangerous. I like seeing the hand of the artist in art, even areas that have been worked and reworked. Setting out to create a masterpiece can be stifling, I mean just do something you feel strongly about and amazing things are possible and just might happen. Inspiration for me comes from a passion within to record the scenes that often times are bypassed by a hectic society. These scenes fade into the background of everyday life, but many have a story to tell - be it good or bad. Inspiration triggered by knowing the "back story" of a scene or by someone's spirit. My art, like these scenes, would not stand out in a big show. It's not flashy or ephemeral. It's enduring.”

www.jamesmbonner.com

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Lothar Nickel

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Lothar Nickel was born in Dusseldorf, Germany in 1957 and was introduced to stone carving during a trip to the west coast of Scotland. He received his Diploma in Sculpture & Fine Arts from the Alanus College of Art in Bonn, Germany.

His sculptures come to life as a synthesis of his sensitive yet confident mastery of materials and his delight in playfully contrasting different sculptural elements. His creations touch the viewer by virtue of their subtle vitality and the inner life with which the artist imbues the inanimate substance.

The figurative element, when it appears, is not a starting point but the result of a process in which the artist seeks to devise sculptural movements and spatial gestures which echo the inner experience of his keen interest in life and his empathy for all creatures, be it animal or man. Lothar Nickel invents sculptural characters which develop a life of their own. In the sculpture "Himalama" for instance, he embodies a kind of fabulous animal which calls upon the viewer to contemplate the artist's work by inventing the creature's own life story.

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Gordon Greenwood

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Gordon Greenwood majored in art throughout his academic years in the northeastern United States, ultimately completing a Master of Fine Arts degree from Temple University in 1953. There were periods of residence in Japan, Hawaii, California, Nevada and finally settlement in Camden, Maine. in 1988. Artwork was pursued in all these locations, but there were stretches of time when the path of life took other directions.

Greenwood explores diverse subjects in differing degrees of representation, but remains generally grounded in a sharply defined symbolic and simplistic style that often emphasizes forms suggested by Nature. Other depictions or imaginations are sometimes present, but always an attempt is made to reflect the core essences of things, whatever they are. Of course, the degree of subjective alteration determines whether or not there is recognizability on the part of the viewer, also depending on the viewer’s own experience. The artist’s intent, nevertheless, is to evoke feelings of familiarity even if they are subconscious. Planned ambiguity is also a recurring theme.

Early work was done in oil paint, but a switch to acrylics was made by the late nineteen sixties. The use of acrylic paint allows for many differing methods of application. A certain richness and variety of surface texture can be achieved, often within the same painting, which contributes added interest. A development in that same vein explores the vibrancy caused by the occasional juxtaposition of color on color in dotted or mottled configurations. Sprayed on color is also used.

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Liz Gribin Prints

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Liz Gribin was born in London in 1934. She and her family moved to the United States just as World War II broke out. Arriving in Manhattan, she began her studies at the Museum of Modern Art and the Art Students League, obtaining her degree in fine arts from Boston University. Niece of the world famous Danish sculptor, Harald Salomon, she has exhibited her work nationally for many years. In New York City her prize-winning paintings have been shown at The National Academy of Design, the Parsons School, Pace University, The National Arts Club, the Lotos Club and the Broome Street Gallery. Outside of the city they have been shown at the Nassau County Museum of Art, The Heckscher Museum, Guild Hall Museum, Sarah Lawrence College, B.J. Spoke Gallery, and the Arlene Bujese Gallery. Gribin has had over a dozen solo exhibitions. She is the winner of innumerable awards, including the Bruce Stevenson Award from the National Arts Club, the Pall Corporation Award at the Heckscher Museum, the Knickerbocker Artist's Gold Medal and the top award from the Audubon Artists, two years running. Her work is part of the permanent collections of the Emily Lowe Gallery at Hofstra University and the Manhattan Bowery Corporation in addition to many outstanding private collections. She was chosen to be honored with the prestigious Eleanor Roosevelt Award for Advancing the Arts on Long Island.

Honored by the Hampton Library as a "living legend" during the bicentennial celebration of the U.S. Library Of Congress. Listed in "Who's Who in American Art" and "Who's Who of American Women". Artist spotlighted on the first "Originals", Public Broadcasting System's television show. The artist and her work have been profiled in The Southampton Press and Dan's papers, Portfolio, Northshore, Boulevard and Long Island magazines. Interviewed on Art Scene on Long Island, Meet Your Neighbors and Focus On Women, which is part of Harvard University, Schlesinger Library Archives. Now back in Massachusetts after half a century, she enjoys working and living in her spacious studio in Gorse.

www.lizgribin.com

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Peter DeCamp Haines

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Peter DeCamp Haines grew up in Ohio and is a graduate of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts. He is a founding member of the Boston Sculptors Gallery and a co-founder of the Vermont Gentlemen's Foundry. Haines is known for his Artifacts- pure forms- favoring geometry, the compound curve, negative space and clean silhouettes. The images range from tools to architecture to stylized animals and humans. In total, these objects comprise a "personal archaeology".

ARTIST STATEMENT - The Object is the Idea

I am a maker of objects, and the object itself is the main idea in my sculpture. For 30 years, I have been working on a project that consists of a collection of minimal, tool-like bronzes- now numbering in the hundreds. Metaphorically, I think of this work as "An Archaeology" of the subconscious. Artifacts have been a continuing thread in my work since I found my first one (an axe) in a dream around 1975. Simple, elegant, refined - they seem to me to be simultaneously archaic and modern. Metaphorically, I think of these objects, now numbering in the hundreds, as an 'archaeology' of the subconscious. They are made for the hand as well as for the eye. Simple shapes elaborate into complexity. Images (humans, animals, architecture, tools ) inevitably appear. I think that this is the projection of the warm subconscious onto the cool geometry of elemental forms.

On another level, the artifacts are studies of archetypal forms which can be elaborated into more complex images. An advantage of sculpture is that ideas such as wholeness, beauty, timelessness can be expressed without words. One of the elements of this wordless expression is negative space. A doughnut is defined by its hole. If one accepts space as part of the doughnut, where does the doughnut end? Thus the doorways, windows, silhouettes of my sculptures can suggest an area larger than the sculpture itself.

Since Marcel Duchamp in the 1930's, ideas about sculpture have proliferated in countless directions, from Andy Warhol to Nam June Paik. My own pursuit has been a continuing exploration of the formal attributes of sculpture: form, scale, negative space, composition.

www.hainessculpture.com

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Igor Galanin

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As a successful artist, book illustrator and theatrical designer in the former Soviet Union, Igor Galanin enjoyed professional success and recognition-without freedom of expression. Yet he had an inner Machanism that understood what freedom was all about. Within his personal, painted kingdom, Galanin let freedom ring. If he wanted a chair to rest on water instead of a floor, he put it there. If he thought the fruit in a still life should go floating out of its bowl, away it went. Seeking liberty for himself and his family, Galanin emigrated to the United States in 1972.

On the surface, Galanin’s paintings are purely a celebration of the sensual. In this carnival of earthy delights, women with delicate, aristocratic features and round, voluptuous bodies take center stage. Whether they are enjoying a park vista from the comfort of a bench, or flying threw the air on the trapeze, Galanin’s big beautiful women remain serenely in control of their surroundings. Expressing a wholly unique artistic, vision these technically masterful painting contain lighthearted nods to mannerism, to Surrealism, and to the dainty theatrical caprices of Jean-Antoine Watteau. Galanin’s jewel-box palette and dramatic use of dark backgrounds may bring to mind Russia’s decorative black-lacquer art objects, as well as religious icons.

Perhaps because they are the direct descendants of this venerable artistic tradition, Galanin’s cast-bronze sculptures possess a timeless simplicity and power. They have the same energy and charm as his paintings, and frequently treat the same subject matter. Each original or limited-edition sculpture is cast in bronze, then colored through the application of acid and heat. When placed outdoors, the sculptures will develop a rich patina.

www.igorgalanin.com

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Serge Hollerbach

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Former instructor at the National Academy and current member of the Academy and numerous other important organizations, Serge's mostly figurative paintings of modern urban living have gained him renown in contemporary realism.

Born in 1923 in Pushkin, a suburb of St. Petersburg, Russia (then Leningrad), Serge Hollerbach drew constantly as a child, encouraged by an uncle who was an art and literary critic in Leningrad. An ardent and frequent visitor to the Hermitage Museum, Hollerbach decided at 17 that he would become a painter. He had studied at the High School of Art for only six months when the Nazis occupied the small town where he lived. “Subsequently, I spent the war years as a laborer in Germany, where I was sent with hundreds of thousands of Russian men and women to work in the fields and factories,” Hollerbach says.

After the war ended, he enrolled in the Academy of Fine Arts Munich, where he was “drilled in quick linear drawing and expressionistic characterization.” In 1949, he embarked on a career as a professional artist in New York City. By the late 1950s, he was exhibiting his work in the city, across the country and in Europe. A frequent contributor to The Artist’s Magazine throughout its history, Hollerbach, though legally blind, continues to produce work of beauty and vigor.

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Wendy Newbold Patterson

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I am an oil painter with an interest in ancestry, stones, memory and ancient places. My art education was thorough, with a deep foundation in European, American art and work from life. I still "draw from life" and follow where it leads me. I draw from life many, many times every day and night. Drawing is my active participation plan with Life. It is a simple act, a primal response and a constant nourishment of being. Drawing from life is a dialogue with now.

Rembrandt taught me to draw from life. His works said to me, “Go out to the roads and markets, see and draw, draw and see. Build a visual vocabulary, tools to tell your story.”

Cezanne and Nature taught me about light, plastic form and energy. Energy must move from and through forms. Light, color and rhythm are the roots, branches and vines that keep forms in the energy flow. I paint and draw figures in a space. I work with stones to see nature in simpler forms, movement and light. I work back and forth between stones and figures. There is an intriguing resonance between them. I reach for the energy and the powerful relationships.

The figure is an invented language with vocabulary drawn from life. I have developed the tools to express the living and beloved reality in front of me, as I have discovered a resonance, an echo of my own inner reality. I see. I draw and paint. I see what I see, what I feel and who I am. The figure is a vessel containing sensations of all human experience. The figure is a voice. It speaks to us of ourselves.

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Alan Fishman

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Born and raised in New York City, Alan Fishman has been an artist for more than forty years. He received a BFA from Cornell University, with further study and years of residence in Italy. Fishman's works are continually exhibited in group and solo exhibitions, and can be found in many collections around the world. 

His bright acrylic paintings are bold, direct, and filled with a distinctive musical energy. With a love of color, texture, and form, Fishman’s paintings reflect and refract the natural world, the realm of ancient myth, the tangle of human relationships, and the complexity of the human spirit. It’s no small coincidence that his work is so often described as lyrical: Alan Fishman is also an accomplished classical musician, who has been playing the piano since the age of five. 

As Steven May wrote in a featured article in Portland Magazine in 2004, “Fishman traces his artistic roots mainly to Europe, citing as examples Klee, Matisse, Monet, and Picasso. And while his art may start with recognizable forms, it primarily reflects his interest in light, movement, color, and abstraction."

A Professor Emeritus of the Fashion Institute of Technology, Fishman now lives with his wife and their son in a converted barn on the coast of Maine.

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Clara Cohan

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It was during my growing up time that I was taught the foundations of drawing and painting.  My mother, who is an artist, spent many afternoons teaching me about the anatomy of light, form, color theories, and oil painting.

1968 - 1974   There was the search for the Self.  And there was art class.  The perfect place to explore feelings and to begin to express what I felt about the world and my place in it. I was most influenced by the Surrealists; Tanguy, Dali, Magrette, and M.C. Escher.  Paintings during this time frame came directly from the inner landscapes and intellectual wandering of my mind. With my early training, I found I could easily paint what I saw with my mind's eye and create worlds that were very different from "reality".  In 1972, I had an opportunity to broaden my experiences with summer classes at the Chautauqua Art Institute, Chautauqua, NY.  This experience put me into a studio setting where I felt very much at home.

1974 -1976  After spending two-and-a-half years at college pursuing a teaching degree in art and psychology, I left the academic world.  This was a major turning point, deciding not to become a teacher, but to develop and gain experience in being a professional artist.  In 1976, I spent part of a summer in Germany, Austria, and Amsterdam, exploring the arts of this region.

1977 - 1985  The most defining time period for me. Knowing that I wanted to be a full-time artist, and knowing income would be fairly non-existent, I chose to develop a life-style to support my goals and financial challenges. A self-sufficient living situation is what I needed to create.  First, buy land and then build a small home.

I purchased five acres of wooded land in upstate New York and built a small cabin.   I lived here for eight years, growing my own food, fishing and foraging wild greens, heating and cooking on a wood stove, choosing to not to hook up to the electric company.   With a few hours dedicated to daily chores, the rest of my day was filled with drawing and painting.   I co-founded the Battenkill Art League which provided stimulation from a community of artists. A mix of commercial art work and art festivals provided enough income.

Also during this time frame, I would make many sojourns to the desert southwest,  Inspired by the color and forms of the landscape, and the spiritual aspect of the wide open spaces, I created my "Mandala Sandpainting" series.  This was another expressive form that showed me vividly that symbols are the language of the unconscious, the inner self, and speak in universal ways.

It was during the later part of the cabin years that I began visiting New York City.   I was drawn in by the intensity of what the city had to offer me personally and as an artist. Thus began one and two month long stays for the next 16 years in order to study at the Art Students League, drawing daily from the works of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Natural History, contacting galleries and spending hours drawing from the surrounding street scenes.

1986  Feeling the need to expand my marketing experiences, I moved from my cabin in the woods, to Albany, NY.  I opened a studio/gallery and exhibited in local galleries and cafes.


1986 - 2000
I developed a workshop utilizing the Mandala, bringing people into closer communication and relationship with their inner selves.  I held workshops in Albany and scheduled a many city-tour that eventually led me to Sedona, Arizona.  For the next 14 years, I would become involved in the arts community of Sedona, Cottonwood, Jerome and Scottsdale, AZ.

During the desert years, I created several distinct styles of paintings, including the airbrushed "Mythic Reality" series and the New York oil paintings of the "Humanity" series.   Also, I created Cosmic Turtle Creations, a home-based industry, sandblasting contemporary petroglyphs onto flagstone, which developed into a thriving nation-wide business.

In 1979, I had my first exhibit in NYC, showcasing 26 paintings from the "Humanity" series.

It was the ten-years of very hands-on building of our home that brought me to the realization of my abilities as a sculptor.  In the last year-and-a-half of my time in Arizona, I apprenticed with Daniel Newman, a stone sculptor.

2001 -2007  Having had a full experience of living in the southwest, Sharon and I decided it was time to experience living by the Atlantic Ocean.  In 2001, we sold our desert home and purchased a 1910 Cape in Cape Elizabeth, Maine.  For me, Portland, Maine, showed great promise as a new territory to enter into.  I found the galleries receptive to my stone and wood sculptures.  Seeing a need for more exposure for sculptors, I co-founded MAINE SCULPTORS, setting up shows throughout the state.  I also established the Changing Tides Gallery, an exhibit space for emerging artists.

2005 was a changing year for me.  Years of heavy physical labor of constructing my own homes and working years in stone, began effecting my neck, back and arms. Putting all taxing work aside, I was able to stop the deterioration and manage the pain.  Sorting out what I could and could not do, gave me a new start and direction.  Teaching part-time, sculpting only wood, and being employed as the visiting artist/sculptor in the local Middle School, (please see the "Courtyard Project"), allows me to continue on.

A new series of sculptures,"Contemplating Our Place in the Universe" became my major focus. Throughout my career, my deepest passion has been the symbolic language of the unconscious and the transforming effect it has on individuals and in the development of a culture. I have studied the archetypal, primal and symbolic imagery of ancient and modern earth-based cultures and religions. Through travel, I have directly experienced the symbolic nature of such cultures as the Rapa Nui of Easter Island, native South Pacific peoples, the earth-based cultures of Ireland, Mexico, and the Native American, particularly the Hopi Indians of Northern Arizona.

Visual symbols that repeatedly arise include, the nest and egg, lightening bolts, a single eye, patterns of stars, earth, moon, raven, elephant, whale, human and "cosmic" figures. From re-claimed wood, these and other symbols are carved to represent stories. The re-occurring theme is about connection; to our own self, with others, with the environment, and ultimately, with the infinite cosmos.

2008  - 2015 I took a position of security officer at the Portland Museum of Art. This has given me a great vantage point to view not only the paintings and sculptures of the museum, but to experience the purpose and workings of a museum. I am still creating sculptures for the "Contemplating Our Place in the Universe" series.

www.claracohan.com

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John Neville

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John Neville’s nostalgic works of art of bygone days chronicle the folklore and daily lives of the local fishermen and their women from his childhood village. This popular Canadian artist, who splits his time between Nova Scotia and Maine, is a painter, printmaker and story teller who has engaged collectors throughout his long career with his exceptional etchings, and more recently the bold palette and modern compositions of his impressive oil paintings.

A native of Nova Scotia, Neville was born in Halls Harbour on the Bay of Fundy, to a family of boat builders and fishermen where hard work was taken for granted.  He grew up fishing with his father, building boats and listening to the tales of men and women in the local villages. There were stories about bootlegging, bad luck, record catches, rivalries and drunken husbands—all of which became the basis for his rich pictorial language.

At a young age Neville began drawing boats and other subjects on the backs of advertisement broadsheets that his grandfather, the village postmaster, gave him. In 1972 Neville left Halls Harbor to attend the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax where he studied photography and printmaking.  After graduating with a BFA in 1976 from the Centre Gravure de Contemporaine in Geneva, Switzerland, he returned to Halls Harbour to set up a printmaking studio.

In recent years, Neville brought the mark making of his etchings to the brush. His oil paintings are instantly recognizable by his drawing style and his bold use of color, and they continue to tell the tales of these bygone days by recording a rich folklore and a vanishing way of life with consistency and beauty.

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Antje Roitzsch

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For Antje Roitzsch, walking in the woods every morning is a great source of inspiration. By connecting with nature and seeing the daily changes through the seasons Antje notices small things: one day grasses against the snow, another day ice formations on the little brook, or another the dead trees shaped and carved from exposure to the elements.The flow of closely observed water creates wondrous forms and swirls. The budding of new plants implies much potential. The forces that unfold fern, leaves or blossoms in the Spring are what Antje tries to capture in her 3-dimensional work. Indeed, the growth, maturation and unfolding of vegetation mirror human growth, unfolding and developing. Any observer of personal development might resonate with these forms on a deep, perhaps even unconscious level. Even though the casual observer might not recognize the organically inspired nature of Antje's refined work yet might appreciate the harmonious flow of form.

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Being open to a slow process of form development grew out of Antje's Waldorf education in Germany where she studied form metamorphosis with Dr. Peter Wolf. The seven stages of plant development described by poet J.W. Goethe and later by Rudolf Steiner were used as the basis of studies in clay and wood. Following her Waldorf education she studied graphic arts for two years and then completed a 4-year goldsmith apprenticeship in Germany. In 1988 the Carl Duisberg Society awarded her a grant to study the goldsmith technique of Anticlastic Raising for a year with Michael Good of Michael Good Designs in Rockport ME, USA. Antje returned to Germany to work for six months with Professor Friedrich Becker on his innovative stainless steel jewelry and kinetic sculptures. In 1990, she returned to Maine and worked with Michael Good Designs for fifteen years, designing and producing the flowing 3-dimensional shapes of this hand-crafted jewelry.

www.antjeroitzsch.com

Sally Ladd Cole

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Having always lived in rural New Hampshire, I observe with great concern the ever dwindling fields, farms, marshes and forests that I grew up loving and taking for granted.

Through my paintings I hope to bring awareness to the irreplaceable beauty of this rural country and open Atlantic shoreline. These everyday scenes of marshes, meadows, forests and farmland, so filled with sun and shadow, color, powerful contrasts and overall natural grace that I find so much inspiration in, are becoming increasingly rare.

Sally graduated with a BA in Fine Art from the University of New Hampshire in 1971.
She then went on to study with Clifford Smith.

www.sallyladdcole.com

Glade Sarbach Davis

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Glade Sarbach Davis

In 1973, Glade began silver-smithing professionally. Soon he moved to Park City, Utah to work as a designer-goldsmith. In 1978 he took his skills to Sun Valley, Idaho where he expanded his interests to sculpture, to include such mediums as precious metals, bronze, fossil ivory, and stone. In 1982, Glade moved to the Caribbean island of St. Croix, where he owned and operated a custom jewelry and art gallery at a seaside resort. Returning to Idaho 1988, Glade made his home in the west central mountains of Idaho where he continues to make unique jewelry and sculptures.

Glade’s jewelry has been collected by hundreds of discriminating buyers from around the globe, among them Stephen and Tabitha King, authors; and the Hemingway family. Sculptural pieces have been commissioned for the CBS movie “Dreams of Gold” (the story of a treasure hunter, Mel Fisher); The National Theater Workshop for the handicapped (Belfast, Maine campus); Fly Rod & Reel magazine’s “KUDO” award; as well as private collections around the world.

"I met Glade Davis in the early 80's on the island of St. Croix. In the ensuing years we have worked together in studios in the Virgin Islands, Idaho and Maine. Much of the work that bears my name and hallmark would not exist, or quite so beautifully, without his artistic diligence, enthusiasm and technical virtuosity. It has been the collaborative relationship of a lifetime."          - Tom O'Donovan

Artist Statement

As a young man looking over the gaping pock mark scar of the Bingham Canyon mine where I worked for five years in the 1970’s, I longed to do something that would put back some of the beauty that had been ripped from the earth. That’s when I began to teach myself the art of silver-smithing. It was a good feeling to know that as the ugly pit continued to spiral down into the earth… I was on a path to spiral beauty back into the world.

My work is still inspired by the beauty of nature, symbolism, the power of personal sentiment, by the voice of the stone being featured, and of course, by the enormous power of spirit.

My greatest joy, however, comes from my three fantastic children, two sons, a lovely daughter, and my wonderful grand-daughter and grandson and their mom, and my loving daughter-in-law. What a proud parent and grandparent I am, for they are my finest co-creation and legacy. 

 

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Vincente Hernandez

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Oaxaca, Mexico is known for its high-quality traditional pottery. It is from these traditions that artists have grown and evolved. Vicente Hernandez’s pottery is versatile in form and surface, ranging from traditional thrown forms to platters and custom-order dinnerware sets and lamps. Using earthenware clay to create each vessel, the artist decorates with a technique called “scraffito”. A clay slip is applied to the exterior of the pot and then the design is scratched through the slip to reveal the clay underneath the slip. The interiors have been lined with a rutile glossy glaze, making the pottery appropriate for everyday use.

Hand care of the pottery is recommended.

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